Learning English. Learn English with an English Vocabulary Phrase Lesson: How to write a cheque.
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Learning English. Learn English with an English Vocabulary Phrase Lesson: How to write a cheque.

 

With this step by step how-to guide, students can learn how to write a cheque. This lesson teaches students how to write a cheque and also gives students practise writing a cheque. This cheque writing lesson is a fun and interactive activity you can do with your ESL class or student at any level of English. The students can learn and practise the vocabulary used in making and accepting offers to purchase items with these monetary instruments called cheques.

What is a cheque: A cheque is form of currency, a different word for money. It is a form of money that you can use to buy something.

How to write a cheque.

Write a cheque / cash a cheque / cheque clearing: We use the expression, “write a cheque”, because that is exactly what we do, we write in the information including the date, people to pay to and the amount of money on a cheque.

When you write a cheque and use it to pay someone for something, you are actually giving that person permission to make a demand on your bank account to pay the amount you write in the cheque. This is called cashing a cheque.

When the payee cashes the cheque, your bank will take money in the amount you indicated on the cheque from your bank account and give it to the person. This is called the cheque clearing process. If you have enough money in your account the cheque will clear, if you don’t have the money, the cheque will “bounce.” This means it will be sent back to the payee from the bank with a message saying that there is not enough money in the account.

Cheque writing role play: You can set up role plays such as in a department store or an open air market, the options are endless. ESL students can barter or negotiate over the price in English and seal the deal with a cheque.

Extra lesson / vocabulary / discussion: What happens if a cheque bounces? Will you charge an NSF (Non-Sufficient Funds) fee? Did the cheque clear yet? Use your imagination and use our props to make it happen. Do you have to give post-dated checks for your rent, or other purchase?

Writing cheques used to be done a lot in North America and still is a bit, but not much in Asia. There are cheques in Asia, but of a different kind. Usually the cheques used in Asia are cashiers cheques, not personal cheques.

In the United States the spelling is "check(s)" in Canada it is usually spelled "cheque(s)".

Cheque Tips & Vocabulary:

  • Date: always be sure to date your cheque to ensure you, as the cheque writer, state when it is valid. What could happen if you don’t date the cheque?
  • Payee: You, as the cheque writer are the payor, and the person you give it to is the ‘payee’. This means that the payee can “cash” the cheque, or “deposit” the cheque into his or her bank account. What could happen if you leave the payee blank?
  • Pay to the Order of: a cheque is a type of demand currency note. In other words it upon the demand by the payee, the cheque is treated as money. However, the person or bank cashing the cheque does not have to accept it. There is risk involved to the person taking a cheque, it may “bounce”.
  • Bounce a cheque: for a cheque to bounce means that the bank returned it, after depositing or cashing it and said that the payor has not enough money in his or her account to pay the amount of the cheque.
  • Post dated cheque: this means you date the cheque for later, in the future. Often in Canada and the USA, when people pay rent for their apartment they have to give their landlord post-dated cheques for the rent payments.

In Canada when you open a bank account, the bank will usually ask you if you want a chequing account or a savings account. The chequing account is usually the more common, or the first account you will open, as it is the account you use for your daily banking such as (paying bills, withdraw money, make deposits for your paycheck, etc).

Use the below sample cheques to learn how to write a cheque.

How to write a cheque.

 

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